22 October 2011

Census Saturday - 1910 Federal Census - Joseph & Frances Legge Household


This week we are still following Harry A. Legge. He was living with his parents in Hays City Ward 3, Ellis, Kansas in the 1910 Federal Census.

Joseph and Frances Legge household
Thirteenth Census of the United States: 1910 - Population; State: Kansas; County: Ellis; Hays City; Supervisor's District No. 6; Enumeration District No. 19; Sheet No. 9 B; page 1451 (handwritten); Enumerated by me on the 22nd day of April, 1910. Jur. H. Freesa, Enumerator. Street: West Perry Avenue; Lines 68-72; Dwelling 199; Family 204. 
Joseph Legge, head, male, white, 62 years old, married for 33 years, born in Germany, father born in Germany, mother born in Germany, immigrated in 1868, naturalized, speaks English, occupation is own income, able to read and write, owns his own home free of mortgage. 
Frances Legge, wife, female, white, 50 years old, married for 33 years, gave birth to 15 children, 10 were living, born in New Jersey, father born in Germany, mother born in Germany, speaks English, no occupation, able to read and write. 
Louisa Legge, daughter, female, white, 13 years old, single, born in Kansas, father born in Germany, mother born in New Jersey, speaks English, no occupation, able to read and write, attended school.
Harry Legge, son, male, white, 10 years old, single, born in Kansas, father born in Germany, mother born in New Jersey, speaks English, no occupation, able to read and write, attended school. 
Tresia [sic] Legge, daughter, female, white, 6 years old, single, born in Kansas, father born in Germany, mother born in New Jersey, no occupation, [education information blank].


Harry is living with his parents and the youngest of all his siblings. There was a child between Louisa and Harry named Helena "Lena" Legge, but she died in 1901 at the age of two. His mother, Frances (Franzika), noted that she had given birth to 15 children, however only 10 were living at the time of this census. Another interesting piece of information is that "own income" is listed as the occupation for head of the household, Joseph Legge. I'm not sure if this means he is retired or self-employed, but I would think they would specify self-employed if that were the case. He does own his home home though with no mortgage. The two older children are attending school. It is also noted that they live on West Perry Avenue, however, I was unable to locate this street on a map, so it's possible the name of the street was changed at some point.

Source: 1910 U.S. census, Ellis, Kansas, population schedule, Hays, enumeration district (ED) 19, sheet 9B, p. 1451 (handwritten), dwelling 199, family 204, Joseph Legge household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http:www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 Sep 2011); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T624, roll 438.

15 October 2011

Census Saturday - 1930 Census - Harry & Veronica Legge


This week I am going back another decade with Harry & Veronica Legge. In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, they were just married and she was pregnant with their first child, Harold, who would be born in July of that year. They were living in Fairview, Rush, Kansas on a farm.
Harry & Veronica Legge Household
Fourteenth Census of the United States: 1920 - Population. 
State: Kansas; County: Rush; Fairview Township; Supervisor's District No 7; Enumeration District No 214; Sheet No 4A; Enumerated by me on the 27th day of January 1920, Wm Crotinger, Enumerator. Lines 20-21; House number: FM; Dwelling No. 56; Family No. 56: 
Harry Legge, Head, rented house, male, white, 19 years old, married, did not attend school since Sept. 1 1919, able to read, able to write, born in Kansas; father born in W-s--ollin [crossed out] Germany, mother tongue German; mother born in New Jersey, able to speak English; trade of farming on general farm; Farm schedule 57. 
Veronica Legge, wife, female, white, 17 years old, married, did not attend school since Sept. 1 1919; able to read; able to write; born in Kansas; father born in [illegible crossed out word] Russia, mother tongue German; mother born in Kansas; able to speak English; occupation none.


I've learned that Harry & Veronica were living and working a farm they do not own. I learn that both of their mother were born in America and their fathers born outside of the country. What I find most interesting in this census is that the enumerator had written down a specific location within the country their fathers were born in. Unfortunately, they were badly written and then crossed out so I am unable to read them. Harry's brother was living in the same town and has the same crossed out name, but that is difficult to read as well.

Source: 1920 U.S. census, Rush, Kansas, population schedule, Fairview, enumeration district (ED) 214, sheet 4A, p. 751 (handwritten), dwelling 56, family 56, Harry Legge household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 Sep 2011); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T625, roll 547.

10 October 2011

52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy and History - My Second Grade Teacher

When I was growing up I loved school. I loved learning, seeing my friends, getting new school clothes and school supplies. Teachers, especially in elementary school where you only had one all year, were important and could either enrich your school experience or make you miserable for nine months. I know there were teachers I didn't care for in high school, but luckily you didn't have to spend all day with them and I learned fairly young that if you just figure out what they are looking for and give them what they ask, the year would go by pretty smoothly. In general though, my feelings were usually lukewarm for my teachers.

My all-time favorite teacher, however, was my second grade teacher Mr. Anderson. I loved him! He was young and handsome and had a beard, so that probably made him cool in our eyes. He also played guitar and he would bring it in and teach us songs like Yellow Submarine and Puff the Magic Dragon. I can remember the giant notepads that teachers used where he had written the words to the songs so that we could memorize them. Looking back, I'm not sure how it all fit into our lesson plan, but at the time we loved it.

One specific memory I have about him as a teacher is just a little snippet, but it's funny that it stuck with me. We must have had an increase in writing exercises in second grade because I developed the callous that you get on your knuckle that comes from writing with a pencil. I remember it hurting and going to him and telling him I had this injury expecting to be sent to the nurse. He just smiled and said that it comes with writing. Then he showed me that he had the same callous on his finger, only his was huge. Then he sent me on my way without a band aid or anything! It makes me laugh now because I remember walking away confused because he hadn't given me a bandage for my wound and what was I going to do now!?

Another memory I have of him is just an image... but a pretty vivid one, I must say! My mom taught an aerobics class at the school and one day I went into the gym where her class was and realized that Mr. Anderson was in the class. He was wearing a full body leotard. I remember being shocked that he was wearing that outfit and a little embarrassed. That image was forever burned in my brain and I can't think of Mr. Anderson without thinking of him in that outfit!

If my memory serves me, Mr. Anderson only taught the one year, however, when I think about it, I don't really know for sure if he taught before our class. I feel like I remember him saying it was his first year teaching although that might have been his first year at our school or teaching second grade. I do know, however, that it was his last year teaching at my elementary school. He was going into the Peace Corps. It made the end of the year all that much more sad because he wasn't coming back. I remember sitting at my desk the last day of school and we were singing Puff the Magic Dragon. I cried through the whole thing. So did many of my classmates. I don't know how he made it through the song with a bunch of second graders crying! I remember I couldn't look at him because it hurt too bad. My other classmates that I've contacted through the years still remember him and his songs and they all loved him too!

When I was pregnant with my son and thinking of names, I was having a hard time coming up with a middle name. I wanted it to be meaningful, but I hadn't started doing genealogy yet so I didn't have a vast resource of family names to choose from. A friend of mine suggested thinking of someone who influenced you in your life in a positive way to come up with a middle name. It's funny because he's the first person I thought of. It seems sad in hindsight that I didn't have more positive male influences in my life, but I knew his first name was James and it fit perfectly with my son's first name. My son today still loves to hear the story about why I picked his names for him. It blows my mind how much impact one person can have on a kid's life... even if just for one year.

24 September 2011

Census Saturday - 1925 Kansas Census - Harry Legge Household


This week I am looking at the Kansas State census of 1925. The Legge family is still living in Fairview, Rush, Kansas and only have the first three children living with them.


State: Kansas; County: Rush; Township: Fairview; Post Office: La Crosse; Page 1 (stamped); Lines 10-14; Name or number of street, avenue, rural route, etc. 2; Number of house or box, if on rural route: 52; Dwelling number 3; Family number 3.
Harry Leggle, head, male, white, 24 years old, married, born in Kansas, no occupation, did not attend school, able to read and write.
Veroniga [sic] Leggle, wife, female, white, 22 years old, married, born in Kansas, no occupation, did not attend school, able to read and write.H
Harold Leggle, son, male, white, 4 years old, single, born in Kansas, no occupation, did not attend school, not able to read and write.
Ralph Leggle, son, male, white, 2 years old, single, born in New Jersey, from New Jersey to Kansas, no occupation, did not attend school, not able to read and write.
Dorethy Leggle, daughter, female, white, 1 year old, single, born in New Jersey, from New Jersey to Kansas, no occupation, did not attend school, not able to readn and write.


First, the surname is spelled wrong. I had to look for them manually in the database on Ancestry because they weren't coming up in a simple search. Harry's name had been indexed incorrectly as Marry. The rest is just the incorrect spelling by the enumerator. Little Dorothy is only one year old and was born in New Jersey, so the family must have moved back sometime in the year and a half prior to this census and after she was born. Another interesting notation on this census is that there is no profession listed for Harry. I'm not completely positive this was an error, but it seems unlikely that he wouldn't have been working while trying to provide for a small family. It's also possible he was between jobs.

Source: 1925 State Census, Rush County, Kansas, population schedule, Fairview, p. 1 (stamped), dwelling 3, family 3, lines 10-14, Harry Leggle household; digital images, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 Sep 2011); citing Kansas City Historical Society, Microfilm Reel K131.

21 September 2011

Wednesday's Child & Wordless Wednesday - Sarah "Sadie" Barrows


Little Sadie (Sarah) Barrows was about three years old when she died in 1887. This may be the only photo of her and looks like it was taken when she was maybe one or two years old. She is such a beautiful child and it is heartbreaking to know that she didn't live much longer when this photo was taken.

20 September 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Sarah A. Barrows (1884-1887)

Sarah A.
1884-1887

Sarah A. Barrows is buried near her parents, William and Minnie Barrows, and shares the same stone as her sister, Althea C. (Barrows) Thayer. She is buried in Lockwood Cemetery in Lockwood, NY.

Source: Sarah A. Barrows gravestone, Lockwood Cemetery, Lockwood (Tioga County) New York; photographed by Monica Palmer October 2010.

17 September 2011

Census Saturday - Harry A. Legge Household, Fairview, Kansas


This week I am moving to a different side of the family... the Legge family. This family is in my maternal line. In 1930, the Legge family consisted of two adults and six children all under the age of ten. They were living in Fairview, Rush, Kansas.


State: Kansas; County: Rush; Fairview Township; Enumeration District No. 83-9; Supervisor's District No. 8; Sheet No. 2B; Page 0151 (handwritten); Enumerated by me on April 17, 1930, Walter H Nickel, Enumerator. [actual census taken April 18th according to left margin] Lines 58-65; Dwelling 36; Family 38.
1) Harry A. Legge, Head, home rented, owns radio set, family lives on a farm, male, white, 29 years old, married, aged 18 at first marriage, did not attend school, able to read and write, born in Kansas, father born in Germany, mother born in New Jersey, able to speak English, Farmer, General Farm, Own account, not a veteran, farm schedule no. 39
2) Veronica M Legge, Wife of head, female, white, 27 years old, married, aged 16 at first marriage, did not attend school, able to read and write, born in Kansas, father born in Russia, mother born in Kansas, able to speak English, no occupation.
3) Harold Legge, son, male, white, 9 years old, single, did attend school, born in Kansas, parents born in Kansas, no occupation.
4) Ralph Legge, son, male, white, 7 years old, single, did attend school, born in New Jersey, parents born in Kansas, no occupation.
5) Dorothy M. Legge, daughter, female, white, 6 years old, single, did attend school, born in New Jersey, parents born in Kansas, no occupation.
6) Edward Legge, son, male, white, 4 years 7 months old, single, did not attend school, born in Kansas, parents born in Kansas, no occupation.
7) Robert Legge, son, male, white, 3 years 1 month old, single, did not attend school, born in Kansas, parents born in Kansas.
8) Alfred Legge, son, male, white, 1 year 3 months old, single, did not attend school, born in Kansas, parents born in Kansas, no occupation.

I noted several things from this census. There are pretty exact ages listed for the youngest three children, which leads me to believe that it was the mother, Veronica, who was giving this information to the enumerator. It's possible that it was the father, however, it seems more likely the mother would be tracking this information more closely. The ages given match the time frame I have for the known birth dates of these children as well. The birthplaces of both Harry and Veronica confirm information I already had. I also learn that they married at relatively young ages of 18 and 16 years old. Two of the older children were born in New Jersey, so it appears the family moved there for a period of time, possibly to be closer to his family. I will be looking into that time and place to see if I can locate any records of their time there.

Source: 1930 U.S. census, Rush County, Kansas, population schedule, Fairview, enumeration district (ED) 9, sheet 2B, p. 0151 (handwritten), dwelling 36, family 38, Harry A. Legge household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 31 Mar 2011); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T626, roll 718.

13 September 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Althea C. (Barrows) Thayer


Althea C. (Barrows) Thayer is buried in Lockwood Cemetery in Lockwood, New York. She is buried by her parents, William and Minnie Barrows, and shares a stone with her sister, Sarah Barrows.

Source: Althea C. tombstone, Lockwood Cemetery, Lockwood (Tioga County), New York; photographed by Monica Palmer, October 2010.

07 September 2011

Wordless Wednesday - The Capek Sisters (Updated)

In March, I posted a copy of this photo (see previous post here). I had been asking where the original was and my mother-in-law knew someone had it, but couldn't remember who it was. We kind of forgot about it until it was unearthed in a batch of photos lent to me by a cousin on that side of the family! I was so excited to see it and it's amazing how much detail you could not see on the previous copy I had, such as the two girls holding hands. It is such a sweet gesture captured in this photo, especially since this little sister would later die when she was eight.

19 July 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Wilmina "Minnie" M. Tannery Barrows (1861-1923)

Minnie T. Barrows - 1861-1923




Wilmina "Minnie" M. Tannery Barrows was born in 1861 according to her grave marker in Waverly, Tioga, New York and she also died there in 1923. She is buried in the Lockwood Cemetery alongside her husband, William, and two daughters, Sarah and Althea C. Thayer. Lockwood Cemetery is located in Lockwood, Tioga, New York.

18 July 2011

Motivation Monday - Getting Back on Track

I just took a week off from everything genealogy. I put my volunteer projects on hold, stopped reading any blogs or genealogy related books, didn't touch any records, put off starting my genealogy class, and even stopped looking at my email account that I have devoted to genealogy purposes.  I was feeling overwhelmed and a little burnt out with everything that I had on my plate. In short, genealogy had started to feel like a chore and that's when I knew I needed a break!

It's summertime and my son is home all day. That means more mess, more "Can't we go SOMEwhere Mom??", and more whining from my daughter as they get sick of playing with each other. And we are only halfway through! I find myself torn between different activities I've committed myself to. Time management has always been a struggle for me. So I decided to take a week off to clear my head and re-prioritize.

At first, it was really difficult getting past the "I should be doing [fill in the genealogy activity]." I have to admit that after about Day 3, I was enjoying my time off although I was having a hard time finding things to do during the hottest part of the day when I don't want to do anything that is going to make me hotter. My son was shocked that I was taking a week off and when I told him the reason he gave me some wise and simple advice: "Mom, treat it [time worked on genealogy] like money. You only have so much of it, so you budget it. Figure out how much time you want to work on genealogy and when you run out, you're done." It was pretty good advice for a 9 year old!

So today is Monday and my week off is over. I've had a chance to prioritize and hopefully I can make it stick. I'm taking my son's advice and am going to budget my time so that I can get chores done around the house, take my kids' to fun activities, and still get stuff done in my beautiful land of genealogy. First thing though is cleaning house. Literally. My house is a mess. I'm also going to have to focus my volunteer efforts on only one thing right now. I have a couple of things going that I will finish up and then I am going to focus on one main project, which is my other blog Southern Tier Cemeteries.

To keep it simple, I'm focusing on these projects:
  1. My blogs: This one and Southern Tier Cemeteries.
  2. I'm in the process of revamping my filing system and syncing it with my genealogy software and Ancestry.com trees.
  3. Genealogy classes through NIGS.
Before I can do anything though, I need to get some order in my office. So my efforts this week are going to be focused on the following:
  • Cleaning my office 
  • Going through the paper piles and putting them where they need to go
  • Finish scanning some family photos so I can get them back to their owner (and there is a family reunion in 2 weeks that I need to have them done by!)
  • Finish up a volunteer project so that I don't have that hanging over my head.
  • Start my class!
  • Continue working on organizing my cemetery photos for my other blog.
I think that is plenty to work on for this week! We are also doing some home improvement projects around the house, so I should be plenty busy!

Does anyone have any other advice (other than my son's) on how they manage their genealogy time in their busy daily lives?

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

09 July 2011

Census Saturday - 1920 Census - Rienerth Family


Today we are going back 10 years from the previous 1930 Census for the George Rienerth household and looking at the 1920 census. They were living in Boardman, Mahoning, Ohio on McClurg Road. This is most likely the same home they were at in 1930. In this census, their last name is misspelled as Rienherth and Regina's first name is listed as Virginia. Another change on this census is the date of immigration for Regina. The 1920 census indicates she immigrated in 1903 and the 1930 census lists 1905. The native tongue for both George and Regina was German, however, both could speak English.

1920 US Census - George Rienherth Household

Department of Commerce - Bureau of the Census
Fourteenth Census of the United States: 1920 - Population
State: Ohio
County: Mahoning
Township or Other Division of County: Boardman Township
Supervisor's District No. 265; Enumeration District No. 105; Sheet No. 6B
Enumerated by me on the 12 day of January 1920. Levi P. Good, Enumerator.
Street: McClurg Road; House Number: X; Dwelling No: 136; Family No. 144
Lines 89-95
89) George Rienherth, Head, Owns home, Mortgaged, male, white, age 36, married, immigrated in 1903, naturalized in 1914, able to read and write, born in Austria and mother tongue was German, father born in Austria and mother tongue German, mother born in Austria and mother tongue German, able to speak English, Mason in the brick layer industry, Wage earner.
90) Virginia Rienherth, wife, female, white, age 34, married, immigrated in 1903, naturalized in 1914, able to read and write, born in Austria and mother tongue German, father born in Austria and mother tongue German, mother born in Austria and mother tongue German, able to speak English, no occupation.
91) Hilda Rienherth, daughter, female, white, age 12, single, attended school, able to read and write, born in Ohio, father born in Austria and mother tongue German, mother born in Austria and mother tongue German, able to speak English, no occupation.
92) Carl Rienherth, son, male, white, age 10, single, attended school, able to read and write, born in Ohio, father born in Austria and mother tongue German, mother born in Austria and mother tongue German, able to speak English, no occupation.
93) Herman Rienherth, son, male, white, age 8, single, attended school, born in Ohio, father born in Austria and mother tongue German, mother born in Austria and mother tongue German, no occupation.
94) Paul Rienherth, son, male, white, age 5, single, born in Ohio, father born in Austria and mother tongue German, mother born in Austria and mother tongue German, no occupation.
95) George Rienherth, son, male, white, age 3, single, born in Ohio, father born in Austria and mother tongue German, mother born in Austria and mother tongue German, no occupation.
Source: 1920 U.S. census, Mahoning, Ohio, population schedule, Boardman Township, enumeration district (ED) 105, sheet B, p. 6, dwelling 136, family 144, George Rienherth Household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 Jun 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T625, roll 1412.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

06 July 2011

Wedding Wednesday - Ezra Barrows and Rose Frantel

Ezra Canfield Barrows and Rosie Capek Frantel met around 1923 in Elmira, New York. They both worked at American Sales Book Company in different departments. According to their daughter, Rose may have known someone in the department Ezra was working in and was visiting that person when she first noticed him and thought he was handsome. He must have noticed her too at some point along the way because he sent her a note at work asking her out. Up until this point, everyone called her Rosie. Ezra addressed her as Rose and from then on, that is the name she went by. He signed his note "I.K.E." His nickname was Ike, but since he wrote it like they were initials, she initially couldn't figure out who had sent it to her. She must have asked someone who it was because they started dating.

They did not have a formal wedding. They got their marriage license the same day and went into a church and had the minister marry them. They chose the Erste Deutsche Evangelische Kirche [First German Evangelical Church] in Elmira, New York.

By Lvklock (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons
Their marriage record confirms this and even shows witnesses to look into. The family story is that it was only the minister and his wife who witnessed the marriage, however, there are two witnesses and neither of them bear the same name as the minister.


Record of Marriages, page 180
No. 10888
Column 1: For the Groom
Name: Ezra Canfield Barrows
Residence: 1005 Gr. Central Ave. Elmira, NY
Occupation: Paper Cutter
Birthplace: Lockwood, N.Y.
Father: Wm. Barrows
Birthplace: U.S.A.
Mother: Minnie Tannery
Birthplace: U.S.A.
Color: White
Age 26
No. of Marriage: 1st
Column 2: For the Bride
Name: Rose Anna Frantl
Residence: 210 Washington St. Elmira, N.Y.
Occupation: Packing
Birthplace: New York City
Father: Joseph Capek
Birthplace: Austria
Mother: Antoinette Prochaska
Birthplace: [blank or illegible in copy]
Color: White
Age: 22
No. of Marriage: 1st
Date of License: Oct. 11- [19]24; Date of Marriage: Oct 11 [19]24; Place of Marriage: Elmira, N.Y.; Official: R. Vieiveg; Profession: Minister; Witness: Nellie A. Garrigan & Samuel C. Fabletta.

I also have a copy of their wedding certificate given to them by the church, which is actually quite beautiful.

This Certifies That Ezra C. Barrows of Elmira, NY and Rose A. Frantl of Elmira, NY were united in Marriage according to the Ordinance of God and the Laws of the State of New York on the 11th day of October in the year of Our Lord 1924 One Thousand Nine Hundred twenty four. Witnesses: Samuel C. Falletta, Nellie A. Garrigan. R. Vieweg, Pastor. [Seal] Erste Deutsche Evangelische Kirche [First German Evangelical Church], Elmira, NY.
Ezra and Rose's wedding gifts to each other were professional portraits of themselves. There are no photos of them together on their wedding day and it is unclear if these photos were taken before or after their marriage. Either way, they were most likely taken close to their marriage date, circa October 1924.

Ezra Barrows


Rose Capek Frantel Barrows

This marriage produced five children. They were married until Ezra passed away in 1987. His last years were spent in a hospice and she walked over to visit him every single day. She lived on to be 102 years old.

Sources:
Marriage Record: Chemung, New York, Marriage Records, 1908-1935, 3: 180, Barrows-Frantl, 1924; FHL microfilm 849,271, item 10888.
Marriage Certificate: Erste Deutsche Evangelische Kirche (Elmira, New York, USA), Heirloom Marriage Certificate, Ezra C. Barrows & Rose A. Frantl (1924), issued 1924; Erste Deutsche Evangelische Kirche, Elmira; Color copy of marriage certificate in author's possession. Original held privately.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

03 July 2011

Sunday's Obituary - William S. Barrows

WILLIAM S. BARROWS died Thursday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Charles J. Gartenschlager, 1005 Grand Central avenue, aged seventy-three years. He is survived by his daughter, Mrs. Gartenschlager of Elmira, four sons, Frank of Auburn, Ezra of Elmira, Ray and Mitchell of Lockwood. The funeral will be held at the family home at Lockwood this afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. The Rev. M. Logan will officiate. Burial in the Lockwood cemetery.
 
William died approximately one year after his wife, Minnie. It has not been verified if he moved in with his daughter after her death or if he was just visiting. There is most likely a more informative obituary in the Lockwood/Barton area since he lived there for a good part of his life, however, since he died in Elmira there was a short mention of it.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

28 June 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Harry J. Frantel (1915 - 2001)


Harry J. Frantel
May 10 1915
Sept. 1 2001
WWII Veteran
Harry J. Frantel was the oldest son of Leo J. Frantel and Antonia Prochazka Capek Frantel. He was born in New York and he passed away in Sebastian Florida. He now rests in Woodlawn Cemetery near his parents.

Source: Harry J. Frantel gravestone, Section Y, Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira (Chemung County), New York; personally read and photographed by author on 26 Jun 2010.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

25 June 2011

Census Saturday - 1930 U.S. Federal Census - Rienerth Household

My favorite records since I started my pursuits in genealogy have been census records. It is exciting to see your ancestors' names in these records and it is like looking at a snapshot of their lives with all the information it includes. I am starting this series on my blog to keep a record my family's census entries.

The 1930 United States Federal Cense finds my great-grandparents George and Regina (Konnerth) Rienerth living in Boardman Township in Mahoning County, Ohio. They had all of their children living with them at this point and were most likely living in the house that my great-grandfather built himself. He was listed as being a self-employed brick layer. His oldest daughter, Hilda, was still living at home and working as a teacher at a grade school. His oldest son was also working as a laborer at the steel mill. His youngest 3 boys (including my grandfather) were attending school.

1930 US Federal Census - George Rienerth household
 
Department of Commerce - Bureau of the Census
Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930
Population Schedule
State: Ohio
County: Mahoning
Township or other division of county: Boardman twp (part)
Enumeration District No. 50-100
Supervisor's District No. 10
Enumerated by me on May 5, 1930 Stephen A Burl, Enumerator.
Street, avenue, road, etc: McClurg Rd.
House Number: [blank]
Number of dwelling house in order of visitation: 858
Number of family in order of visitation: 889
Lines 24-30
24) George Rienerth, Head, Owns home valued at $3,500, Radio set, not a farm, male, white age 46,  married, 23y old at time of first marriage, did not attend school within year, able to read and write, born in Austria, father born in Austria, mother born in Austria, language before coming to the U.S. was German, immigrated in 1903, naturalized citizen, able to speak English, occupation was brick layer in the industry of contracting building, E[mployer], actually at work, did not serve in US armed forces.
25) Regina Rienerth, Wife of head, female, white, age 44, male, 21 years at time of first marriage, did not attend school within year, able to read and write, born in Austria, father born in Austria, mother born in Austria, language before coming to the U.S. was German, immigrated in 1905, naturalized citizen, occupation none.
26) Hilda Rienerth, daughter, female, white, age 21, single, did not attend school within the year, able to read and write, born in Ohio, father born in Austria, mother born in Austria, able to speak English, occupation teacher in grade school, W[age earner], actually at work.
27) Karl Rienerth, son, male, white, age 19, single, did not attend school within the year, able to read and write, born in Ohio, father born in Austria, mother born in Austria, able to speak English, occupation labor in steel mill, W[age earner], actually at work, did not serve U.S. armed forces.
28) Herman Rienerth, son, male, white, age 17, single, attended school within the year, able to read and write, born in Ohio, father born in Austria, mother born in Austria, occupation none.
29) Paul Rienerth, son, male, white, age 15, single, attended school within the year, able to read and write, born in Ohio, father born in Austria, mother born in Austria, occupation none.
30) George Rienerth Jr, son, male, white, age 13, single, attended school within the year, able to read and write, born in Ohio, father born in Austria, mother born in Austria, occupation none.
Source: 1930 United States Federal Census, Mahoning County, Ohio, population schedule, Boardman Township (part), Enumeration District 100, p. 36A, dwelling, 858, family 889, George Rienerth household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 Oct 2009); from National Archives microfilm publication T626, roll 1841.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

22 June 2011

Wordless Wednesday - Hetrick Sisters

Ruth Ertzinger, Arlene Rienerth, Herman Rienerth
This photo is of Ruth (Hetrick) Ertzinger, Arlene (Hetrick) Rienerth, and Herman Rienerth. They are in Tucson, Arizona most likely at the home of Herman and Arlene Rienerth. The photo was most likely taken sometime in the early 1970's.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

14 June 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Leo Frantel (1883-1943)


Father
Leo Frantel
1883-1943 

Leo Frantel, 1883-1943, was the second husband of Antonia Prochazka Capek. They were married about 1914 in an unknown location, although it is probable that it was in New York. After her first husband and youngest daughter died in New York City, she moved to Elmira with Leo. It is presumed that she married him in New York City, although I have not verified this. They had two children from this marriage. They rest together in Woodlawn Cemetery in Elmira, New York.

Source: Leo Frantel gravestone, Sec. Y, Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira (Chemung County), New York; personally read and photographed by the author on 26 Jun 2010.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

11 June 2011

The Elusive Second Marriage - Follow Up

A few weeks ago, I posted about a second marriage involving my grandmother and a mystery man. I ordered the marriage certificate online from the Clark County, Nevada Recorder's office and it arrived rather quickly.

Unfortunately, it did not have that much information on it and it kind of got lost in the shuffle since I received several information laden documents from the Family History Library the next day. Basically, I got distracted.

I did sent out an email with a copy of the scanned image to my aunts and uncles speculating that this could be the correct person, but that I couldn't know for sure. I was rewarded with several emails of confirmation that this was the right guy. The name seem to have triggered some memories because there were stories I had never heard before. They were not good ones either. I seem to have opened up a can of worms.

I guess this is the risk we take when we do more recent research. Bad feelings were brought forth that had been buried for awhile. One of my relatives asked that we just forget he ever existed. Unfortunately, I can't do that being the way that I am, however, I can just enter the facts of the record and move on. I don't have a lot of curiosity at this point about where this man ended up  and what happened with him, and I certainly don't feel a need to dredge up awful memories for my family out of respect for them. I think for the time being, I will let this fact just remain what it is ... a fact only.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

10 June 2011

Marriage Record of Joseph Capek and Antonie Procházka

Joseph Capek, date unknown but prior to 1908
I received a marriage record from the Family History Library that turned out to be a treasure trove of information. The family is on my husband's side and is Czechoslovakian. My mother-in-law knew they came from Bohemia, but that is about all she knew of the origins of her grandmother. Her biological grandfather passed away when her mother was a small girl, so she grew up knowing the second husband as her grandfather.

This is one of those cases where it pays to get a copy of the actual record. It was indexed simply with names, parents' names, and the date of marriage. But as you can see, there is SO much more on this one record. I did not find anything stating that I could not post an image of the certificate on my blog, but if anyone knows differently please tell me so that I'm not violating any copyright laws.
Capek-Prochazka Marriage Record, 1901
Transcription:

City of New York.                                                                                         
No. of Certificate, 16063
STATE OF NEW YORK
[Stamp] Bureau of Records Received Sep 25 1901 Borough of Ma[nhattan]

I Hereby Certify that Joseph Čapek and Antonie Procházka were joined in Marriage by me in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, in the City of New York, this twenty first day of September 1901.

Witnesses to the Marriage, Václar Fous, Jan Procházka. Signature of person performing the ceremony: Wenceslaus Supik.

Date of Marriage. September 21st 19[image cut off]
Groom's Full Name. Joseph Čapek
Residence. 424 E 75 St
Age. 26 years
Color. White
Single or Widowed. Single
Birthplace. Dolní Krupá in Boh. [Czech Republic]
Father's Name. John Čapek
Mother's Maiden Name. Frances Bemák
Number of Groom's Marriage. First
Bride's Full Name. Antonie Procházka
Residence. 422 E. 75 St
Age. 26
Color. White
Single or Widowed. Single
Maiden Name, if a Widow. ---
Birthplace. Hrabĕšín Bohemia [Czech Republic]
Father's Name. Joseph Procházka
Mother's Maiden Name. Marie Čerinak
Number of Bride's Marriage. Frist [sic]
Name of Person performing Ceremony. Wenceslaus Supik csm
Official Station. Catholic Priest
Residence. 323 E. 61 St
Date of [rest cut off]

[Page Two - back of form]
We, the Groom and Bride named in this Certificate, hereby certify, that the informaton given therein is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.
[Signature] Josef Čapek Groom,
[Signature] Tony Procháska Bride.
Signed in the presence of Vaclar Fous and J Prochaska [difficult to read]


Not only did we find more exact birthplaces for each of them, but we have parents' names (one was incorrectly indexed) and where they lived when they got married, which by the addresses it appears they were neighbors!

Page Two of this record (the back) has their signatures as well as the signatures of the witnesses. My mother-in-law was always under the impression that her grandmother had traveled to this country as an orphan and that she didn't know anyone here, but if you look at the witnesses to the marriage, one of them has the same last name as her!
I looked up the Catholic Priest who performed the marriage, Wencelaus Supik, as I thought this was an unusual name. I searched Ancestry.com and managed to find a photo posted of him at an age that was close to 31 when he performed the marriage. It makes it more personal to know what the priest looked like who performed the ceremony.

My mother-in-law was very excited by all of this information as was I!! It has been one of the most exciting records I've found, although I am certainly not a seasoned researcher, so I'm hoping for many more like this in the future!

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

07 June 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Great-Grandparents

My daughter standing with her great-grandparents' grave
Being a stay at home mom means that my 3 year old pretty much goes with me everywhere... including cemeteries. I have to say she is a pretty good sport about it (we call them adventures or "abentures" in her words), but she is one of those children that is just happy to be wherever she is, especially when she is with her family. She insists on posing with grave markers in every cemetery we frequent (and we go to a lot of them). I hope this doesn't freak her out when she's old enough to look back and understand what that grave marker means. 

Here she is standing with her great-grandparents, Ezra Canfield & Rose Ann Barrows in Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira, New York.

Barrows
Rose A.
1902-2005
~
Ezra C.
1898-1987

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

30 May 2011

Military Monday - Happy Memorial Day

Today is a time to remember all the soldiers who fought and died for our freedom as well as their families who worried, prayed for, and sometimes lost them.

Here is my own little tribute to the soldiers in my life...

My Dad ~ Vietnam War
Herman Rienerth ~ World War II ~ US Army
Arlene Hetrick Rienerth ~ World War II ~ MAM3 US Navy

Richard L Throp ~ US Army
Gary O. Palmer ~ US Navy
Joseph G. Lucas ~ World War I & II ~ US Army
Richard Perry (left) ~ US Navy
Ed Perry ~ US Army
Al Perry ~ US Navy
Karl Rienerth ~ World War II ~ POW ~ US Army
Roy E. Brickman ~ World War I Casualty ~ US Army
John Barrows ~ US Air Force
Thank you to my family mentioned here and to all the other soldiers out there who have served our country and  protected the safety of my family!

25 May 2011

Wordless Wednesday -

Herman Rienerth
 This is my grandfather, Herman Rienerth, born 1911 in Youngstown, Ohio. I am unsure of the date or location, however, am guessing that it is sometime in the 1940s, most likely after he was discharged from World War II. This photo amuses me because of the way he's standing. He always seemed so serious when I was growing up, so this pose almost looks comical to me. It could be because he makes me think of Indiana Jones with his hat and jacket.

© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

24 May 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Antoinette Frantel (1877-1956)

Antoinette P. Frantel grave marker
Mother
Antoinette P.
Frantel
1877-1956
 
Antonia (tombstone lists her as Antoinette) Prochazka Capek Frantel was born 1877 (according to her grave marker) in Bohemia. She immigrated to America when she was 17 and married Joseph Capek, also from Bohemia. She had two daughters with him and then lost him in 1908 to influenza. Five years later, she lost her youngest daughter, Antonia, as well. She remarried Leo Frantel and moved to Elmira, New York where she spent the rest of her days. She now rests in Woodlawn Cemetery in Elmira, NY.

Source: Antoinette P. Frantel tombstone, Section BB, Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira (Chemung County), New York; read and photographed by the writer, 26 Jun 2010. 
© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

20 May 2011

Family Recipe Friday - The Old Cookbook

When my step-grandfather passed away, all the items in his and my predeceased grandmother's house had to be taken care of. There was a sense of urgency surrounding the event because not all of us lived there to take care of things at our leisure. A huge pile was made at the front of the house of things that would be donated. I'm not sure who decided what was worth keeping and what was worth getting rid of; I'm sure it was a collaboration of efforts. It was one of those times where I wish I had the money to rent a storage locker and just put everything in there so that I could go through it more slowly.

1935 Better Homes & Gardens Cookbook
I managed to go through the donation pile a little before it was all taken away and I thank goodness that I did. While I admit that most of it was probably not worth keeping, I did find two Better Homes and Gardens Cookbooks (I think all of us have our own copy of this cookbook). One was published in 1935 and the other in the 1950's. I kept the one from 1935 and my cousin's 12 year old daughter kept the other one because she loves to cook.

The 1935 version is too old to have been purchased new by my grandmother (she was born in 1933), so I like to think that it was her mother's and she kept it as her own when she started her own family. On the other hand, it could have been purchased by her years later at a yard sale for she was an avid "yard-saler." The sentimental side of me likes to think it's the former. Regardless, there are handwritten recipes included in this 1935 version that I believe are hers (I compared the handwriting to some samples I have of hers).
The first page of the cookbook. Notice the handwritten recipes on the side.

Unfortunately, I do not know if she made these recipes up or if she copied them from somewhere  else, but I will be posting them here.

I will start with a short recipe that was found on the Table of Contents card at the front of the book (see above picture). I will transcribe the handwriting to the best of my ability.

Rolls ~ 3 pans
2 qt Milk, scalded and cooled
1/2 lb yeast
1 cup sugar
2 hands full salt
1 cup shortening
Unfortunately, there are no cooking instructions to go along with this, just ingredients. I'm sure she knew how long to cook it and probably didn't feel the need to write it down for herself. She probably would have thought me silly for posting her recipes on the internet anyway.


© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

17 May 2011

The Elusive Second Marriage

[Note: I am not including any names in this post to protect the privacy of living individuals.]

My grandmother married an unknown man between my biological grandfather and my step-grandfather. The marriage was short, according to the children, lasting only about six months. None of the children seem to remember his name, however, there is a sense of mystery and gloom surrounding this person.

In my search to find a marriage record for my grandmother and biological grandfather, I had come up empty on the online sources for California. On FamilySearch.org I tried the database California, County Marriages, 1850-1952. I had no luck, so I moved on to Ancestry.com's "California Marriages, 1850-1960." This database indicated that it was not inclusive of all the counties and even though the source information cited the time period as 1850-1960, the title of the database was "California Marriages, 1850-1877." I did a search anyway, but wasn't surprised when I had no results.

Knowing that my grandmother was under 18 when she got married, I thought that maybe they ventured over to Reno or Las Vegas and decided to check the Ancestry.com "Nevada Marriage Index, 1956-2005." To be honest, I didn't even look at the dates on the database and I'm glad that I didn't! If I had, I would have disregarded the database altogether because my grandmother married my grandfather sometime in the mid to late 1940s.

I decided to search through the index manually instead of entering in his last name so that way I could get a look at all of the people with the same last name. As I was scanning through them, I found, to my surprise, an entry with my grandmother's full married name (first husband). Could this be the elusive second husband?? The index was difficult to read, but if the indexed date was correct, the timing would be perfect as it fit neatly between her first and third marriage, which spanned between two years!

I quickly went to the Clark County (NV) Recorder's Office website and found the same record on their marriage search website. It took a bit of adjusting some of the settings, but it finally came up. You can order the certificate right online, but alas, I have to wait until the next payday to order mine. Then I will have to wait until the order is processed! Even though I hate waiting, it will be exciting to check the mail every day! I will write more about this when the record is received. This certificate could be the answer to some of the questions my family has about this mysterious second marriage. 
© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday - Mary/Maria S Perry (1899-1990)

Mary S. Perry 1899-1990 
 Mary S. (Pintor) Perry (listed as Maria in the cemetery's records) was the second wife of my great-grandfather William J. Perry. After his first wife, Lena, died in childbirth, she married William and helped him raise his seven children. It is unknown at this time whether they had any more children together, however, based on the information I do have, it is unlikely. She rests next to William in Lompoc Evergreen Cemetery.

Lompoc Evergreen Cemetery (Lompoc, Santa Barbara, California), Mary S. Perry marker, Catholic Cemetery, Lot 257, Grave 11; personally read and photographed, 15 Sep 2008. 
© copyright Monica Palmer, 2011